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Seabird use of waters adjacent to colonies: Implications for seaward extensions to existing breeding seabird colony Special Protection Areas 2003

Marine JNCC Publications Seabird Surveys 0963-8091 Birds Evidence Important bird sites JNCC report series Marine Marine Habitats Monitoring Seabirds Surveillance and Monitoring 329

Abstract

Between 10 and 27 June 2001, the JNCC systematically surveyed seabirds in the waters immediately adjacent (up to approximately 5 km from mean low water [MLW]) to six seabird colonies hosting nationally and internationally important numbers of seabird species. These breeding season surveys were conducted from chartered vessels using a strip-transect method of counting.

The data analyses here allowed geostatistical and distance band analysis of the densities and distributions of four seabird species engaged in "active" behaviours, namely common guillemot (Uria aalge), Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica), razorbill (Alca torda) and northern gannet (Morus bassanus). This is the first time that detailed surveys of the small-scale distributions of seabirds around British seabird colonies have been undertaken. Quantification of the spatial patterns of seabird species has hitherto not occurred at this scale and at such high resolution.

As the general distribution patterns identified are not site-specific, it is recommended that a generic approach to defining seaward extensions to classified SPAs for common guillemot, razorbill, Atlantic puffin and northern gannet will provide appropriate protection for these species in the waters immediately adjacent to their colonies.

Resource type Publication

Topic category Oceans

Reference date 2003·03·01

Citation
McSorley C.A., Dean B.J., Webb A. & Reid, J.B. 2003. Seabird use of waters adjacent to colonies: Implications for seaward extensions to existing breeding seabird colony Special Protection Areas. JNCC Report No. 329, JNCC, Peterborough.

Lineage
In June 2001, JNCC systematically surveyed seabirds in the waters immediately adjacent to six seabird colonies hosting nationally and internationally important numbers of seabird species.

Responsible organisation
Communications, JNCC publisher

Limitations on public access No limitations

Use constraints Available under the Open Government Licence 3.0

Metadata date 2020·06·04

Metadata point of contact
Communications, JNCC

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